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Thanksgiving Photography Shots You Have to Get

Posted by Jacob Hawthorne on

Thanksgiving is coming up quick. If you are celebrating, you’ll want to get some terrific shots to share. You are sure to look back on the photos you take that day for years to come.

This article will provide tips on the shots you’ll want to get to ensure you don’t miss out on anything.

Behind the Scenes

Don’t wait until everyone is seated at the table. Get into the kitchen and start capturing shots of the meal prep. These photos can be most precious of all.

Group Shots

Once everyone is at the table, capture a few group shots. You may not be able to get a picture of everyone at once while they are sitting so work your way around. Take a photo of one section then move around getting pics as you go. Make sure you have at least one photo of everyone there.

Take Photos of the Table

Food shots are one of the most popular types of shots you can capture when it comes to social media likes. When you take pics of food, don’t just think about the food itself. Think about the composition and other elements of the table.

It’s also important to make sure any props that get in the shot are clean. A dirty glass or utensil can ruin the photo.

Food shots will look best in natural lighting. For best results, put the dish near a north facing window and illuminate it from behind. Try to keep it out of direct sunlight. This will be best for accentuating the color, shades and texture of the food.

Get the Details

While at the party, you may notice details besides the guests and food. For example, there may be a buffet table set up or decorative elements around the home. Take a few shots of these features as well.

Get Candid Moments

You’ll get plenty of posed shots while at the party but be sure to get candid moments as well. Show emotions, shared jokes and smiles to make your collection truly special.

Have an External Flash On Hand

Interior lighting can be unpredictable. An external flash will help you get more uniform lighting as compared to an in-camera flash. Try reflecting your flash on the ceiling or wall opposite the subject for the best effect possible.

Use a Remote Control

A remote control will be ideal if you’re planning to get in on some of the family photos. It will also make for less time setting up the camera.

Use a Tripod

A tripod may be bulky to carry around at an intimate Thanksgiving party, but it will help you get steady group photos. Try leaving it in the car and access it when necessary.

Pay Attention to White Balance

Shooting in RAW will give you more freedom in editing, especially in terms of color correction. However, it’s advisable to get it right in the first place. For best results, set your camera to Custom WB so you can change your balance manually as you go. You should also take test shots of a white piece of paper in each room you are shooting to ensure your balance is right.

Thanksgiving is a special holiday. The tips in this article will help you capture your holiday event perfectly, so you have beautiful memories to share. What do you do when you know your pictures have to come out terrific?


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