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Photography Effects You Will Want to Integrate in Your Photo Shoots

Posted by Jacob Hawthorne on

As a photographer, you know that the right effects can make all the difference when it comes to getting shots that stand out. This article will discuss the technique you should be integrating if you are looking to boost your skill level.

Bokeh

The difference in lens aberrations and aperture causes areas of a photo to blur making for an effect known as bokeh which means haze of blur in Japanese. Bokeh can produce a look that’s aesthetically pleasing, but it can also ruin a shot so its best to know when and how to use it. It is effective if used on backdrops, particularly those with some sort of illumination.

Panning

Panning is the horizontal or rotational movement of a subject. It is created by focusing on something that’s moving to keep it in focus while producing a blurred background. It provides an illusion of speed and movement and it’s perfect if you’re photographing sports and other high action activities.

Rule of Thirds

Not so much of an effect as a composition rule, the rule of thirds is based on the fact that photos can be divided into sections of nine using three vertical lines and three horizontal lines. The subjects in your picture will look best if they fall on the intersections. Some cameras show the grid in the view helping photographers get the perfect composition.

Golden Hour

Golden hours occur at sunrise and sunset. They are known for being the best time of day to shoot. They make for warm hues, soft lighting and long shadows that are perfect for photography.

Golden Rectangle

Also known as the Golden Mean or Golden Ratio, the Golden Rectangle is another guide for composition. It’s a bit more complicated than the rule of thirds and it’s based on the ratio of numbers in the Fibonacci Sequence.

Basically, it makes for a rectangle that contains a square and a half a square. It has been a rule of composition for centuries and was integrated into famous works like the Mona Lisa. It is also the natural shape of shells and butterflies.

Fill Flash

Fill flash may be necessary if the backdrop is brighter than the subject. To avoid the inevitable shadows that will fall on the subject, adjust the shutter speed and aperture to provide the right exposure for the background. Then use the flash to eliminate shadows from the subject while maintaining the visual integrity of the background.

Long Exposure

Long exposure involves creating trails of light by using a narrow aperture and a longer shutter speed. It is great for producing a dreamy effect. It works well in low light situations.

Contre-Jour

Contre-Jour is a French term that means ‘against daylight’ and it is commonly known as silhouette photography. It works when the light source is directly behind the subject. It is often used in nature and landscape shots, and it can add drama to a scene.

Now that you know more about the effects you can create with photography, you are ready to take your skill level up a notch. Which of these techniques will you be trying at your next shoot?

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