Free Standard Shipping on all Ready to Hang Art



How to Avoid Unflattering Shadows in Photos

Posted by Jacob Hawthorne on

How to Avoid Unflattering Shadows in Photos

Unflattering shadows can ruin a photo. They can darken faces, disrupt your photo’s composition, detract from your subject and more. The question is, how can we get rid of these unwanted shadows? Here are a few solutions. 

Set the Camera to Manual

Setting your camera to manual mode will allow you to control all elements making shadows less likely to appear. It’s ideal to set the shutter speed between 1/60 and 1/200 to eliminate artificial light interference. It’s also advisable to reduce the depth of field which will allow you to capture sharp images in a variety of settings and lighting conditions. 

Use a Reflector

A reflector will provide a soft fill for shadows that fall on the subject. It can be one of the most valuable tools when it comes to eliminating shadows in photos. The best part is, reflectors are relatively inexpensive. In fact, a white paper or poster board covered with foil can do the trick. 

Move the Subject

If you see shadows appearing in your shot, try moving the subject closer or farther away from the area in which the shadow is appearing. 

Move Your Flash

Just like you can move your subject, you can also move your flash. This will make the shadows change position so they are not as disruptive, or it may eliminate them completely. 

Diffuse the Light

Diffusing the light will also help reduce shadows. You can do this by using a diffusion dome, a plastic cover that fits over the head of the flash. It spreads and softens the light making shadows less likely to appear. 

Dial Down the Power of the Flash

If you are working with a TTL (Through the Lens) flash, you can dial down its power. If you use this in combination with natural light, you will eliminate shadows. 

Use Natural Light Natural light may still produce shadows, but they won’t be as harsh. It’s best to use light from a window that is facing the north as it will produce softer light than one that faces the east or west. Direct sunlight should not be coming through the window, it should be diffused instead. 

Add a Bulb

A soft white bulb is ideal if you can’t count on natural light. Put it in a shade-less lamp that’s placed in front and to the side of the object you are shooting. Keep it a few inches higher than the subject’s head for ideal results. 

Know Your Camera

There are certain aperture, ISO and shutter speed settings that will reduce the appearance of shadows. These may vary from camera to camera, but once you are familiar with how your camera functions, you will be able to figure it out. 

Use a Flash Bracket

You can use a flash bracket so your flash will always be above the lens. This placement will cause shadows to fall behind your subject, so you take photos without shadows. 

Shadows can diminish the appearance of a great photo. Now that you know how to eliminate them, you are ready to take some awesome shots. What will you be doing to get your photos looking their best? 

Read more of a Conversation about Art or Shop Now at Schmidt Fine Art Gallery

0 comments

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published

Related Posts

How a Zoom Lens Can Stifle Your Creativity
How a Zoom Lens Can Stifle Your Creativity
How a Zoom Lens Can Stifle Your Creativity Zoom lenses are great because they provide photographers with a wide varie...
Read More
Understanding Flash Triggers and Receivers
Understanding Flash Triggers and Receivers
Understanding Flash Triggers and Receivers As a photographer, you are probably familiar with the pitfalls of flash ph...
Read More
How to Get a Blurry Foreground with Photography
How to Get a Blurry Foreground with Photography
How to Get a Blurry Foreground with Photography We’ve all seen photography with a blurry background, but a blurry for...
Read More

×
Welcome Newcomer